The Culling

This entry covers the entire “The Culling” crossover, in this order:

  • Superboy Vol.6 issue 7
  • Teen Titans Vol.4 issues 7 – 8
  • Superboy Vol.6 issue 8
  • Legion Lost Vol.2 issue 8
  • Teen Titans Vol.4 Annual 1
  • Superboy Vol.6 issue 9
  • Legion Lost Vol.2 issue 9 and
  • Teen Titans Vol.4 issue 9

written by Scott Lobdell and Tom Defalco.

Wildstorm concepts: WildCATS - Warblade StormWatch - Fuji Gen13 - Grunge Gen13 - Caitlin Fairchild

All-star WesternThe Culling is a long crossover between the series of Superboy, Teen Titans and Legion Lost, bringing together the storylines these books had been developing since the beginning.

Picking up where we left off, Superboy gets tired of all the mysteries and secrecy around him and starts trashing N.O.W.H.E.R.E. again. He’s stopped by Rose Wilson, a mercenary tasked with taking Superboy down if he ever lost control. What these two don’t know is they’re are also prime Ravagers candidates. Rose is also the daughter of Deathstroke, the Team 7 member, and although it isn’t revealed yet, she’s a metahuman. She has the ability to dampen other people’s powers, making her the perfect candidate for stopping Superboy, should the need ever come.

After Superboy’s outburst the organization deems him a failed project and decides to dispose of him, but the Teen Titans break into the place to rescue him. This was exactly what Harvest needed; to have all these youngling together for their capture. The big boss appears and stops the Titans, dealing with all of them at once. He sends the Titans to The Colony to be tested against all the other captured teenagers, but he leaves Superboy in the laboratories. He decides to give him another chance at becoming an effective weapon under the tutelage of one of his Ravagers: Grunge!

The Grunge of this timeline is like a dark, twisted version of our old Percival. This Grunge hates to be treated like a joke, reacting violently to it, as if he hated to be reminded of what he used to be in the old universe. Like the original, he used to need to touch things to gain their properties, but after he won a Culling and became a Ravager, N.O.W.H.E.R.E. filled his body with technological implants to amplify his abilities. By the time he meets Superboy he’s a full-fledged metamorph, capable of turning into anything just by thinking about it.

Superboy isn’t too thrilled about learning how to be a stone cold killer, so he fights against Grudge and the brawl turns so violent that he’s forced to kill Grunge to survive. Harvest is impressed; it seems Superboy wasn’t such a failed project after all. He decides to send Superboy to The Colony with the Titans, and to let Rose occupy the new vacancy in the Ravagers. At the same time, Caitlin wakes up in the hospital after N.O.W.H.E.R.E. captured her and fired her. Still worried about all the kids in danger, he rushes to The Colony, hoping to make it in time.

The Legion of Superheroes is captured shortly after, when Harvest sends seven members of the Ravagers to retrieve them. Now that all the teenagers are in The Colony, this year’s Culling is ready to begin. It is a very convoluted story with a ridiculous amount of characters, so here’s the breakdown:

Teen Titans

The Legion

Kids from the Colony

The Ravagers
(also called The Thirteen)

Red Robin (leader)
Skitter
Wonder Girl
Kid Flash
Solstice
Superboy
Bunker
Tyroc (leader)
Gates
Dawnstar
Timber Wolf
Tellus
Wildfire
Chameleon Girl
First Point
Thunder
Lightning
Beast Boy
Terra
Artemis
Warblade (leader)
Fuji
Crush
Misbelief
Hammersmith
Rose Wilson
Windstrom
Psykill
Omen
Leash
Templar
Ridge
Centerhall

 

Map of the ColonyYeah, it’s a cast of 33 characters, and that’s not even counting Harvest and Caitlin. It seems very random that they would include two Wildstorm characters among the Ravagers, especially considering they don’t retain anything about their old personalities or backgrounds. Fuji doesn’t even get any dialogue and Warblade doesn’t look at all like his WSU version, and that’s strange when you consider he was specially designed by Jim Lee.

Despite the amount of characters and dialogue throughout the story, things develop in a fairly traditional way. Harvest sends the Teen Titans against the Legion of Superheroes, but after an initial conflict both teams decide to work together against their shared enemy. The Ravagers are sent after them, but the heroes manage to triumph. As it turns out, Harvest didn’t send all of his men – we’ll see in following books that he kept several powerful agents under his sleeve. He actually planned for The Culling to fail! Indeed, the Legion sabotages the facility’s power core, so the place starts crumbling down. While Caitlin helps all the kidnapped kids escape, the main cast faces Harvest, but he’s so powerful that they end up having to flee away.

Caitlin knows all of the freed metahumans won’t have an easy time learning how to survive in the real world after so many years in the Colony, so she decides to help them. This leads to a new series, “Ravagers”.

Next: Ravagers issues 1 – 4 and Superboy Vol.6 issue 13, written by Howard Mackie and Tom DeFalco.

 

Teen Titans Vol.4 issues 1 – 2 and Superboy Vol.6 issues 1 – 5

Written by Scott Lobdell

Wildstorm Concepts: Gen13 - Caitlin Fairchild

All-star WesternWe start a new chapter in the unexplored and obscure second Wildstorm universe! The Titans and Superboy are teenagers manipulated by big corporations into becoming super beings, but they manage to escape and be heroes in their own right. Sounds familiar? If this origin story reminds you of Gen13, it’s not coincidental, and it’s no surprise many Gen13 characters appear.

The story is based around Harvest, a man from the 30th century. In his future, metahumans had declared war on normal humans and killed most of them, including Harvest’s son. Superman and Lois Lane had had a child called Jor, so Harvest travels to the past and kidnaps the kid, raising him as his own. He teaches this kid to hate all other metahumans so that Jor would help his cause, but eventually a genetic incompatibility between his human and kryptonian genes causes the kid to die. Harvest is overcome by grief after losing both of his sons, so he keeps travelling back in time to find a cure; but he keeps failing and eventually his chronal energy runs out. Now he’s stranded in our present time; If he is to stop the superhumans he needs to do it there, or nowhere at all. He creates the organization N.O.W.H.E.R.E. to continue his efforts to prevent the meta infestation. He can witness the first generation of metas now; he plans to use their own children to kill them. He begins attempting to recreate his son Jor; in this time he can have access to Superman’s and Lois Lane’s genes. The cloning project is called project Superboy.

Harvest sees himself as a hero; he might be harming thousands of teenagers, but it is for the safety of millions. He works for five years in kidnapping all the teenager superheroes he can find, but he needs a place where he can train his young army for his son when he’s able to lead them. He throws the kidnapped kids into The Colony, a huge underground complex under Antarctica where he leaves the younglings alone to survive. The place is filled with volcanic rock, lava and minimum food; it’s a ghetto of despair in which the dozens of teenagers are forced to fight to survive. It’s a place where he will be able to harvest the young warriors he’ll use to build a better future. Every year there is a Culling — a process of thinning the herd. He selects the best inhabitants of the Colony and sends them to The Crucible, a high-tech arena in which everyone must participate in a battle royal where it’s “kill or be killed.” The survivors go on to serve Harvest as his Ravagers.

N.O.W.H.E.R.E. not only kidnaps heroes, it also creates them. Harvest facilitates the creation of the Teen Titans through manipulation and summons the Legion of Superheroes from the future. Meanwhile, project Superboy keeps on growing until he’s a teenager; he’s kept in controlled environments for the entirety of his upbringing, surrounded by scientists and hardly experiencing any affection. The only person who seems to be on his side is a friendly redhead scientist, none other than an adult Caitlin Fairchild.

Wait, hadn’t she died in “Team 7”? As we’ll find out in the pages of “Ravagers”, she’s been cloned time and time again, brought back to life every time she dies. They aren’t exact clones, though, since they added in powers: now she can switch between her normal body and a huge body with super-strength and resistance, even though every time she powers up she risks losing control, and she can’t keep it up for long. It’s like she can only be the Caitlin from the old universe temporarily. She’s very different to the old Cait; she’s an adult and a legit doctor now.

Caitlin infiltrated the organization because she heard about the kidnapped teenagers, so she wants to save them. Also, she holds no memories of her past after being cloned, so she hopes she might find something about her own origins.

However, Superboy has no clue about all these agendas, so he’s never sure if he can trust anyone. He’s sent into a field mission before he’s properly prepared, so he barely survives. When he makes it back to N.O.W.H.E.R.E. he’s pissed off. He takes it out with Caitlin, starting to fight her and forcing her to reveal her super-strength. This blows her cover, so N.O.W.H.E.R.E. takes her away, and Superboy doesn’t even understand if he’s done the right thing. However, he can’t forget about Caitlin’s kindness, so he hijacks the truck transporting her outside the installation and hands her to Detective Jocelyn Lure. Jocelyn takes Caitlin to a good hospital outside of N.O.W.H.E.R.E.’s reach.

Meanwhile, the Teen Titans start forming when Red Robin finds out the kidnapped teenage heroes, so he decides to get to them before the corporation. Little do they know, they’re playing straight into Harvest’s hand, becoming proper heroes for his Culling.

It’s worth noting Teen Titans is drawn by Brett Booth, Wildstorm regular.

Next: We go over the entire Culling crossover, which includes Superboy Vol.6 issues 7 – 9, Teen Titans Vol.4 issues 7 – 9 and Annual 1, and Legion Lost Vol.2 issues 8 – 9, written by Scott Lobdell and Tom Defalco.

Red Hood and the Outlaws Vol.1 issues 12 – 14

Written by Scott Lobdell

Wildstorm Concepts: WildCATS - Helspont WildCATS - Daemonites

All-star WesternThis is another of the remnants that were left of the big story the Wildstorm books were leading to before the crossover was cancelled. While the first two issues don’t have anything to do with Wildstorm and focus on some unrelated cosmic story, they make mention of the upcoming threat of “The Thirteen.” These are the Thirteen Scions of Salvation, the cosmic council that Helspont hopes to assemble. Basically, these issues show us that many galactic civilizations are getting notice of Helspont’s efforts.

Issue #14 picks up right after the “Superman Annual”. Worried about his meeting with Helspont, Superman visits Starfire, wanting to know if Helspont tried to enlist her too. They’re both aliens residing on Earth, after all. She admits he did, as we could see on the Annual. However, Starfire and her team are less than willing to cooperate with Superman. They don’t like his massive power levels, distrusting him. Besides, they’re outlaws, so they can’t feel comfortable around a member of the Justice League. In the end, they can’t offer any help to Superman, besides promising that they’ll contact him if they hear of any developments. It’s a pretty pointless issue, and it fills most of its pages with pointless fights as the characters think Superman has come to fight with them instead of to talk. Once the misunderstanding is over, there are about two pages of plot.

Not to worry, however. Helspont’s hanging thread will be solved in Part 5.

Next: A new chapter for the WSU in Teen Titans Vol.4 issues 1 – 2, also written by Scott Lobdell.


Voodoo vol.2 issue 0 and Grifter vol.3 issues 13 – 16

Voodoo written by Joshua Williamson, Grifter issues #13-14 written by Rob Liefeld with dialogue by Frank Tieri; issues #15-16 written by Frank Tieri

Wildstorm Concepts: WildCATS - Grifter WildCATS - Max Cash WildCATS - Helspont WildCATS - Daemonites WildCATS - Voodoo authority-apollo stormwatch authority-engineer authority-midnighter authority-doors

All-star WesternThese issues serve as more of an epilogue than anything, as the writers needed to close their plot threads. The bigger story all the Wildstorm books had been building to was cancelled by the editorial, putting a hold to it with Superman Annual #1. So there wasn’t much the writers could do in these pages.

Voodoo #0 was the last issue of the book to be published. So while issues #0 were meant to explain the past of each character, the writer is forced to put some scenes in the present to be able to finish his book. Most of the pages are dedicated to showing us Priscilla’s experience when she was kidnapped by the daemonites, when she was turned into a daemonite hybrid before she escaped and got caught by the Black Razors. It’s nothing that we hadn’t been told through dialogue in previous issues. The final pages are what adds new material: Picking up from Priscilla’s psychic vision in which she was told to help Grifter, Priscilla leaves the Black Razors and finds Cole.

Grifter’s book picks up after Cole escaped from Helspont and made it back to Earth. He and Deathblow go separate ways and Cole is contacted by Warick; the person who rescued him from the daemonites when he was kidnapped and given his powers at the beginning of this mess. He explains everything to Cole about his experiments and all the times the daemonites erased his memory. Now that Cole managed to walk away from meeting Helspont, Warick feels he’s ready to join his rebellion. Helspont might have killed all the daemonites that were planning to invade Earth, but there’s still a secret group: Tsavo’s faction, the ones who’ve been screwing with Cole from the start. Warick proposes bringing their actions to the light of day so that they daemonites are exposed, rendering them unable to start all over again. But to find the necessary proof they’re going to need to steal it from the organizations that have them.

Grifter remembers the information that Eos downloaded into his brain; Eos was Helspont’s ship that he found during his visit to the Himalayas, but it is only named now. Cole now knows StormWatch is the most likely to have useful data. But their base is hidden in hyperspace; he needs to figure out a way to get in. This is when Voodoo finds him, offering to join the team.

Guided by Warick, she and Cole infiltrate S.T.A.R. Labs, where they find a prototype teleportation platform that will help Cole reach Eye of the Storm. He says goodbye to Voodoo by stealing a kiss from her; wow! To think they had only known each other for two pages. By the way, this finishes Voodoo’s role in the story. Wow.

Sneaking into StormWatch’s base is no easy task; he’s detected by the ship’s avatar, Charlie. It alerts Apollo and Midnighter, but Cole is able to defeat both of them because his telekinetic abilities have improved just that much. It’s a pretty unbelievable situation. Cole reaches the ship’s main computer, where he learns how to find the info he’s after – through Amanda Waller, her partner during their Team 7 days! She has files on everyone on the planet. He hacks into her computer and downloads all of her data. Cole says goodbye to the computer by installing a virus on it, which angers Charlie enough to hijack Cole’s teleporting coordinates. Instead of going back to Warick, Cole ends up in the middle of the Belle Reve High Security Prison; headquarters of the Suicide Squad, Amanda Waller’s team. And they aren’t happy about having been hacked.

This is here main writer Rob Liefeld leaves the book. By this point the cancellation had already been announced, so writer Frank Tieri didn’t have a lot of time to fix things. In fact, he was only meant to have one issue, but some merciful editor extended it to two.

Cole attempts to escape from the Suicide Squad; it helps that his abilities have improved to the point where he can stop a bullet mid-air. They are too many for him, though, so he’s captured and taken to Waller. He tries to explain to her that he’s in a rebellion movement against the daemonites, but she’s not convinced. She’s met the rebellion’s leader, Warick, before. In one of her missions with the government she had to snuck into the rebellion and studied Warick’s past, learning that he’s been in and out of several mental asylums. This is why Waller dismisses the daemonites as a lie. Cole is astounded to hear about Warick’s past. Now he doesn’t know what to believe.

This is where the last issue begins. There is a scene in which Cole remembers everything he’s gone through; one of the memories shows his girlfriend Gretchen dying in his hands. However, this never happened, she was abducted by the Black Curate. Or maybe it happened in scenes we didn’t get to see. Oh well.

Waller lets Cole go, knowing he will lead her straight to Warick. Cole arranges a meeting with his boss in a zoo, where he demands answers. Warick explains he’s only been in asylums because no one believed his stories about the daemonites, but Cole isn’t convinced… There are too many lies, too many secrets around him. He tries to walk away from the resistance, but Warick can’t let his only weapon go. The two of them start brawling and hitting the crap of each other, but they are interrupted by Waller and several government soldiers. Cole has to decide if he’ll side with Warick of if he’ll hand him in; but before he can make a choice Warick decides to jump into a cage with polar bears and kill himself. Somehow, Cole is moved by this act. If Warick is willing to go that far to protect the rebellion, then it might just be real.

Cole visits his brother’s grave and thinks about his next step. He decides he needs some time as a regular person; time to find himself with no resistances or aliens. Grifter’s tale comes to an end… for now. Helspont is glad Warick and his resistance are out of the way; and now now Grifter is out of his affairs. For now… let it so remain.

Next: Red Hood and the Outlaws issues 12 – 14, written by Scott Lobdell.

Superman Vol.3 Annual 1

Plot by Scott Lobdell, dialogue by Fabian Nicieza

Wildstorm Concepts: Deathblow WildCATS - Helspont stormwatch WildCATS - Daemonites WildCATS - Grifter WildCATS - Lord Defile

 

All-star WesternThis is it, the big issue that brings all the storylines together. After recovering the Blue Flame from “Voodoo”, Helspont makes his ship visible over Metropolis, defying Superman to come face him. He shows him his true abilities now, including a new and sleeker suit created with the remains from several alien species. Helspont throws Superman against the moon with a single punch; no big deal for him, he has killed Kryptonians before. His old crew starts spreading out around the globe, searching for alien races to recruit. They are his most faithful men, those with whom Helspont shared his Blue Flame powers so many years ago: Salu, Biomass (a titanothrope; NOT the same Biomass from the “Majestic” series), Quom (not to be confused with Quon?), an unnamed old lady and Lord Defile, with his Worldstorm look. Helspont plans to build the “Union of the Thirteen Scions of Salvation”, a council of species which used to be a fairy tale in which the universe was led properly and fairly.

Salu finds the Martian Manhunter, Quom finds Starfire and Defile meets Hawkman; they tell them about the idea before Helspont summons his men to regroup.

When Superman wakes up from his beating, he finds himself inside Grifter’s escape pod, right after Cole and Deathblow escaped from Helspont. I suppose this means Helspont changed costumes in less than five minutes. The three heroes are intercepted by Biomass, so Superman fights him and throws him into Helspont’s ship. Helspont is amused to see the kryptonian, and he orders his troops to kill as many daemonites from Earth as they can. This is the great “alien extinction” heralded in the issue’s cover. Most daemonites on Earth die, and their invasion plans are destroyed. It’s also safe to assume Myev died too. Helspont sends their pain straight to Superman’s mind, subjugating him; Superman is merely an amusement to him. He explains that Superman is actually helping his plans through his constant protection of Earth, since Helspont wouldn’t want his future kingdom to be destroyed.

He leaves him after these words, leaving Superman confused and helpless; even when he’s just doing the right thing he’s still helping Helspont. And he doesn’t know when Helspont will decide to begin his harvest. With all the invading daemonites killed off by Helspont, things come to a pause; this feels like the ending to the first chapter of Wildstorm’s narrative in the new DC Universe.

Next: Voodoo Vol.2 issue 0 and Grifter Vol.2 issues 13 – 16, written by Joshua Williamson, Rob Liefeld and Frank Tieri.

StormWatch Vol.3 issues 10 – 12

Written by Peter Milligan

Wildstorm concepts: stormwatch authority-apollo authority-midnighter authority-jenny-quantum authority-engineer authority-jack-hawksmoor authority-doors WildCATS - Daemonites

 

All-star WesternThe team keeps watch on the different superheroes around Earth, putting on an effort to remain hidden to keep StormWatch a secret. This pisses Apollo off, who hates secrets after a whole life of being in the closet, so he spends the day in a bad mood. Their watch gets interrupted when Angie notices a “phreno-module” has been activated in France. These were advanced cerebral weaponry created by the Shadow Lords for the previous StormWatch in case of crisis, but they were all in danger caches and none of them had been activated since 248 years ago. One of them was unaccounted for, though, and after being found by an archaeologist, it activated and turned the old man into a monster. The menace is quickly resolved when Jenny destroys the module, and the professor returns to normal.

We check up on ex-team members Harry and Projectionist, who are now hiding in Antarctica. Wait, what was that whand toite place they were in before? Anyhow, using the information Harry downloaded from Scourge in the moon, he decides he wants a “subject” to experiment with  create a portal through his body. So he teleports inside a prison and abducts the Fox. Projectionist had altered the media to blame the Fox for the alterations on the moon during the first issues, because they needed to steer attention away from StormWatch; so the villain had been in prison ever since. Harry knows Projectionist won’t use her powers to call for help- he’s used his lying powers to make her fall in love with him.

Back on Eye of the Storm, Angie explains the phreno-modules are a relic from the time in which StormWatch made itself public. After listening to this story Apollo explains to Midnighter his problem with secrets; he struggled with being on the closet for a long time because his dad had been a tough cop and his mom was a big church goer. So Apollo had parents in this timeline, huh? One can’t help but to wonder how he got his powers.

StormWatch #11: StormWatch faces the Hidden People, descendants from the Neanderthals who want to devolve the Homo sapiens so that they become the ruling species. They always try to build a “devolver” and they’ve constantly faced StormWatch through the generations. They did manage to use a devolver in the past, killing an entire incarnation of StormWatch. This included Archie Trundle, the previous Engineer. Angie reflects on this and feels like she’s the inferior Engineer; she hasn’t even been able to turn human since Harry left. In truth, she misses him.

We get a short scene in which Harry keeps experimenting on the Fox, and Projectioner complains that she’s only in love because of Harry’s powers manipulating her. She hints that he must have done the same when he dated Engineer, but Harry loses his cool at this, hinting that perhaps their relationship had been genuine.

Eventually the team tackles on the Hidden People, but they don’t manage to stop a devolver from being activated. To stop it from affecting her team, Engineer swallows it into her own body, fusing it to her technology. As the Neanderthals run away, they’re happy; this had been their plan all along. Now that Engineer swallowed the devolver, she will turn into something catastrophic for StormWatch.

StormWatch #12: Martian Manhunter decides he has other projects to turn to so he’ll leave the team. He starts wiping out the memories of him from everyone, and this causes him to be noticed by the Shadow Cabinet. They teleport him to their base on the Island of Avalon, where they question him: members of StormWatch are prohibited from leaving to keep the group’s secrecy. J’onn is surprised to see there aren’t four four Shadow Lords but three; he picks up from their thoughts that the fourth Lord went missing around the time of the Aztecs. Anyhow, to be permited to leave J’onn is forced to strike a deal: when the time comes he’ll have to do a favour for the Shadow Lords: it will be thing he fears the most. (By the way, we never find out what this means.)

All the while, the team has been dealing with the sudden materialization of 200 Nefertitis busts at random locations, a change so sudden that it shook cities’ minds to the point of causing earthquakes. This was all caused by Harry, who needed a distraction to set his plan in motion and found the busts in one of the danger caches he was looking for. He’s finished turning the Fox into a dimensional gateway, which he will use to reach the Shadow Lords. He’ll pose as the fourth Lord, returned from the dead, and he’ll control the Cabinet!

Next: Superman Vol.3 Annual 1, by Scott Lobdell and Fabian Nicieza.

I, Vampire issues 12 – 13

Written by Joshua Hale Fialkov

Wildstorm concepts: stormwatch authority-jack-hawksmoor authority-apollo authority-midnighter authority-engineer

All-star WesternSorry about the long wait between posts, my computer was broken.

Well, this is a couple of confusing issues, in which StormWatch are little more than a cameo. Jack Hawksmoor realizes that an entire city has disappeared, so they go check it out; it turns out everybody on it has been turned into zombies by the Van Hellsing family, a group of insane vampire hunters. They’re tangled in an all-out fight with a group of vampires, led by the “Vampire Messiah” Andrew Benneth.

This is really hard to tell, though, since the awful traced art makes no distinctions between vampires and zombies and there’s just too many characters in each panel. Anyhow, Hawksmoor, Apollo and Midnighter go help, though it’s hard to tell just who are the good guys. As it turns out, the Van Hellsing have infected most of Andrew’s vampire followers, turning them into zombie vampire vampire hunters! Man, what a stupid sentence. But the point is that there’s almost no good guys at all, just Andrew and three of his associates.

Apollo and Midnighter, the rookie members of the team, can’t quite believe that vampires are real, but they’re stoked. Middy gets to kill Dracula! Although the writer is a mess who can’t quit referencing Anner Rice and teenage vampire romances, he does get Stormwatch’s nonchalant attitude, as Hawksmoor seems more concerned about missing his baseball game than about the situation in hand. In fact, he sums it down as “let’s just kill everyone.”

Apollo throws sunlight at the vampires – since when is he able to do that? – but it doesn’t quite work. It’s all right, though, because he discovers he’s vampire-proof; the ones that bit him turn to ashes!

Apollo goes against Andrew, figuring he’s the leader so killing him will destroy all the others. But not only is he wrong, he’s unable to harm Andrew. It’s interesting that the characters keep mocking Apollo for his assumption of destroying the leader, even though it DID work like that when StormWatch faced vampires on “All-Star Western”.

Andrew and Apollo make amends quickly enough, skip the pointless fight and direct their attention to the zombies. When one of Andrew’s friends gets infected, though, the good guys decide to retreat and find higher ground. Andrew’s vampire girlfriend, Mary, recognizes StormWatch; apparently they clashed a century ago.

Checking in with Engineer, StormWatch finds files on Andrew Benneth that refer to him as “the demon’s lock.” Turns out, Andrew was once used as a magical seal for a psychopath. So if he’s been a trap for dark magic before, maybe he can do it again. Andrew sucks all of the dark magic in the desert up inside of himself, returning all of those within to their human selves. However, this turns him evil, making him the last, most powerful vampire. StormWatch tries to stop him, but they can’t hope to contain him, and Andrew leaves. That’s the last we see of Wildstorm characters in this lame little tale.