All posts by Logan

“Convergence ” issues 3 – 8

Written by Jeff King and Scott Lobdell

Wildstorm Concepts: WSU authority-engineer authority-apollo stormwatch

All-Star WesternSo Telos is making cities from all over the multiverse fight each other, but don’t be mean to him. He’s just a poor brainwashed slave; he used to be called Arak, and he gave his life to save his loved ones from Brainiac’s wrath. Wow, it’s the exact same origin as Silver Surfer. Anyway, the real villain in the story is Deimos, the villain from “Warlord”. He’s using a bunch of time travellers and stealing their “time energy” to get unlimited power. However, Hal Jordan-Parallax kills him and ends up releasing that “time energy” which starts causing reality to break. This turns the planet into a bullet that would “shatter the Multiverse,” so the Time Masters have to free Brainiac. The God redeems himself and decides to use the “time energy” to send all the domed cities back to their own realities and planets. But the original “Crisis on Infinite Earths” is preventing him from sending back those characters, acting like a wall. So a bunch of heroes go back in time to the Crisis to prevent the destruction of the multiverse so that Brainiac can send the other cities back. This way they manage to save the Multiverse, and then Brainiac sends everyone home, except for the Earth-2 heroes who get the Convergence planet as their new home. Scattered here and there are some Wildstorm cameos… Wow, this sucked..

Next: “Grayson” issues 1 – 8, written by Tim Seeley and Tom King.


“Convergence: Superman: The Man of Steel” issues 1 – 2

Written by Louise Simonson

Wildstorm Concepts: Gen13 - Caitlin Fairchild Gen13 - Freefall Gen13 - Grunge Gen13 - Rainmaker Gen13 - Burnout

All-Star WesternAs with every Convergence story, Telos forces two groups to fight: From Metropolis’ side, representing DC, you have Steel and his niece and nephew. On San Diego’s side, representing Wildstorm, you have Gen13. The kids have been hanging out ever since San Diego was trapped in a giant dome and they lost their powers, but when the fights are announced they get their abilities back. But trouble is added to the mix when supervillain Parasite breaks out of prison!

Since Wildstorm characters are psychopaths (sigh) Burnout attacks Steel directly instead of worrying about ethics or trying to talk. Being five against one, they manage to overpower the old man, but then his nephew Natasha gets in the way. Trying to save her, Steel gets his suit destroyed. Right at the same time, Parasite shows up, and without Steel it’s just a bunch of inexperienced kids against him… At first the Gen kids think the monster is working with Steel and attack him all at once, but all they manage is for Parasite to steal all their powers! The only way I see this being justified is because the Gen kids were taken from their dimension at the start of their run, when they were newbies, even though the writer lacks the skills to have them use appropriate slang. While they’re distracting Parasite, Natasha grabs his uncle and gets out of there.

Steel ends up bedridden and with his back broken. While his niece and nephew go rejoin the fight, Steel tries a risky transfusion of techno-organic nano-particles from the dome that will invade and replace his damaged tissue and give him a new suit. Meanwhile, his niece and nephew watch as the Gen13 kids fight hopelessly with the Parasite, having their powers drained. However, Caitlin’s leadership skills come through in the end and they manage to combine their powers to capture the monster. While they’re softened up, Steel’s kids attack, and they start moping the floor with the Gene-actives. Just about then, Steel shows up with his new powers, and the fight begins all over again.

But one doesn’t join the fight: Caitlin. She starts thinking the whole thing is dumb; they were told it was kill or be killed and acted on instinct, without thinking. But now she’s starting to wonder why they’re going along with whoever’s behind all that. As they fight, even Roxy realizes Steel and his family aren’t bad guys, they’re heroes. Both sides decide to stop the fight and work together to stop the real bad guy, and after three stories just like this this ending is getting cliché’d. However, there’s a twist. When Steel tries to bring the fight to the entity and hits they very city they’re standing on, a portal opens and sucks the Gen 13 kids away. There are no clear winners this time.

Next: “Convergence” issues 3 – 8, written by Jeff King & Scott Lobdell.

“Convergence: Batman: Shadow of the Bat” issues 1 – 2

Written by Larry Hama

Wildstorm Concepts: Wetworks Wetworks - Pilgrim Wetworks - Mother One Wetworks - Jester Wetworks - Flattop Wetworks - Dozer Wetworks - Dane Wetworks - Crossbones

All-Star WesternI’m going to go through the events from the point of view of the Wetworks, since Batman is irrelevant to this blog. As with every Convergence tie-in, Telos forces two groups to fight each other, and this time it’s Wetworks versus Batman. These are rookie Wetworks, still not fully used to their symbiotes. After hearing about the challenge, they don’t struggle with it or try to reason with the other side — no, Wetworks go for the kill, because the Wildstorm characters are a bunch of psychopaths compared to the high and mighty DC characters… sigh. Every time the universes cross-over this happens. Anyway, the Wetworks guys want an advantage, so they time-slip a day before the announcement of the challenge and do some recon on Batman, seeing the way he takes down a mobster called Whale. As they’re doing that, another time-slip shows up all of the sudden… Never mind, this is never explained. The following issue begins in an entirely unrelated situation.

Afterwards, they send Crossbones and Flattop against Batman’s companion, Azrael. This isn’t seen, only mentioned, by Azrael takes them down. Still, they guide Batman and Azrael to San Diego, Wetwork’s turf, where they’ll have the advantage. Dozer and Dane spot Azrael and get ready to throw a missile at him, but suddenly a kid shows up and gets in the way. Not caring about the child, Dane says it’s one kid versus the whole city getting wiped if Wetworks loses, so they take they shot anyway. Crazy. Luckily, Batman sneaks up on them and makes them miss the shot. They start fighting, and Batman can take down both Dane and Dozer, which is just dumb.

Afterwards, Batman and Azrael hide in a sunken carrier. Wetworks’ sensors that there are innocent civilians living on the ship, but Dane keeps saying the few need to be sacrificed for the good of the many. They enter and threaten everyone if they don’t reveal Batman’s location, so obviously some people rat them out. They’re hiding with a woman who used to work in the ship. After hearing this, Mother One gets angry that the woman is betraying her city and declares her dead meat. The team splits up and searches for Batman and Azrael. Mother One is the first one to find them, but she gets taken out quickly enough. Talk about no stakes.

Still, Azrael is like an anti-batman; doesn’t have a no-kill rule, loves using guns. He steals Mother One’s “Hydrostatic shock blaster” and they go after the rest of Wetworks. Wetworks finds the mother and her child and try to catch them, but they’re foiled by Batman and Azrael. Batman is winning, but that’s not enogh. He wants to force Dane’s hand, convince them to work together. He doesn’t want either city destroyed. The woman believes him, and gives him her knowledge of the ship to know how to defeat Dane.

They split up, and Batman entertains the rest of Wetworks while Azrael goes to Dane. Using an activated grenade to keep him quiet, Azrael makes his pitch to work together. Surprisingly and randomly, Dane accepts, and the two teams become buddies. Now all that’s left is to take the fight to Telos!

Next: “Convergence: Superman: The Man of Steel” issues 1 – 2, written by Louise Simonson.

“Convergence: Aquaman” issues 1 – 2

Written by Tony Bedard.

Wildstorm Concepts: Deathblow

All-Star WesternThis comic is really fun. The writing is constantly witty, keeping things moving and not drowning in the 90’s feel as this could have been, considering it’s about harpoon-hand Aquaman. Anyhow, Talos is making different universes battle each other, and now it’s turn for 90’s Aquaman VS Classic Wildstorm Deathblow.  That’s the weak point… Deathblow. It’s written as appallingly one-dimensional, little more than a psycho that kills without remorse and is willing to do anything. A crazy military man that gives the old WSU a bad image. “I once hid in a latrine for FIVE HOURS to take out some chieftain in Wazirstan,” he says. This sounds like Cray… “Made sure he suffered for keeping me waiting.” And THAT’s where it ruins it.

Still, he’s smart. Cray’s first move is to break into D.E.O.’s installations – watchdogs of superheroes with a database – and look into Aquaman’s weaknesses. Then he must get into S.T.A.R. Labs, where Aquaman is staying. He immediately starts shooting all the civilians, hoping to shock Aquaman and desestaibilize him. However, Aquaman has super strength – all it takes is a strong punch for Aquaman to break Cray’s neck. And guess what? Cray comes back to life. I mean yeah, that IS his super power, but it doesn’t work as quickly as that. He’s not Wolverine. So Aquaman is faced with an enemy he can’t put down. How will he get out of this?

And thereby lies the problem to this story. Did you read that? Aquaman is the hero in trouble, Deathblow is some villain. Convergence was announced as a tribute to all the characters who haven’t been around us – but this isn’t respect. The DC character gets a much nicer spotlight than the Wildstorm one.

One way or another, the fight goes on. Aquaman gets some water on him, which boosts his strength. Cray needs some help, and he remembers the files he’s read – he knows about S.T.A.R. Labs insurance policy on Aquaman. Using his I.O. training, he gets inside a computer and hacks the “Drydock” program active. As it turns out, Aquaman’s friends had installed a dehydrator system in case Aquaman went rogue – Aquaman loses what little trust he had. Still, his friends come around when he needs them the most. Aquaman is about to get beaten by Deathblow when his friends whisper him an idea through the coms – he can get still water in the form of the blood inside Deathblow! It’s nasty, but it works, since Deathblow can’t die. Aquaman uses his harpoon hand, stabs Cray’s neck and bathes on his blood. This gives him the edge he needed, and he wins the fight. They tie Deathblow up, and Aquaman wins the fight. The Wildstorm city vanishes… to be continued in Convergence.

Next: “Convergence: Batman: Shadow of the Bat” issues 1 – 2, written by Larry Hama.

“Convergence” issues 0 – 2

Written by Dan Jurgens, Jeff King and Scott Lobdell.

Wildstorm Concepts:  WSU

All-Star WesternConvergence is a mess. It’s a sequel to various things… “Future’s End”, “Earth 2: World’s End”, “Superman: Doomed”… it’s completely inaccessible. After the pre-Flashpoint Brainiac survived the reboot, he was filled with a desire to become more, so he travelled to the edge of The Source and beyond it, looking into the Multiverse to witness its story. Reaching through the Multiverse – and through time – in an effort to evolve as the Monitors had, he was mutated by the effects of “crisis” events such as the First Crisis and Infinite Crisis before re-emerging transformed into a god-like being. In “Booster Gold: Future’s End” issue 1 Brainiac captured the time travelling hero Booster Gold and tortured him to find out the location of Vanishing Point. Vanishing Point is place that exists during the last possible moment in the universe from where you can access the complete history of the multiverse. He took it upon himself to save a city from each doomed universe, picking them up right before their destruction and collecting them, creating a giant zoo of 40 cities. Among them– the original Wildstorm timeline. To collect them he invaded a planet called Skartaris, the same from Mike Grell’s “The Warlord”, and took over it to create a planet-sized spaceship he called The Blood Moon. He grabbed one of the planet’s inhabitants, Arak, and brainwashed him to think he was actually the planet’s artificial intelligence: Telos.

However, in one venture to collect a city Brainiac was trapped by Future’s End’s heroes, so taking care of his collection of cities falls to Telos. Left on his own, Telos decides to have the captive cities of the Multiverse into fighting each other to deem the one survivor worthy. And so begins the reappearance of classic Wildstorm characters. It’s a basic premise, or at least it should be, but it’s bogged down by how convoluted everything is.

Convergence #1

Next: “Convergence: Aquaman” issues 1 – 2, written by Tony Bedard.


“Future’s End” issues 31 – 48

Written by Brian Azzarello, Jeff Lemire, Dan Jurgens and Keith Giffen.

Wildstorm Concepts: WildCATS - Grifter WildCATS - Voodoo stormwatch StormWatch - The Carrier authority-engineer

All-star Western 3After the Cadmus island crisis is over, Cole needs to readjust to society. He’s a wanted man, so his new friend Lana Lang offers him to make him a new identity as “Mr. Lang” He is now married! Cole contacts his IT guy, Justin, but just as soon Fifty Sue finds him.

Meanwhile, Voodoo’s team of baddass chicks has gone from “kill Fifty Sue” to “work with Fifty Sue” to “reclaim the DNA vault that sank in the ocean.” As it turns out, when Cadmus Island blew up its DNA bank sank, and all of Cadmus’ men perished with Brother Eye. That means it’s up to Voodoo’s team, along with Cole and Fifty Sue, who know calls herself Sequel in honour of Deathstroke. Cole, Justin and Voodoo reunite after long weeks, and Voodoo is stoked to see Cole alive, what with being his on and off lover and all.

Unexpectedly, Lana lives up to being Fifty Sue’s mother figure and convinces her to stop misusing her powers and calling herself Sequel. Sue agrees to help the mission and simply teleports the vault into the building. Thinking she’s too dangerous, one of Voodoo’s girls, Mercy, goes ahead and kills Sue; Mercy’s touch is mortal. Cole can’t believe Voodoo would accept a hit on a girl just for money, and things get cold between them. However, Sue was simply pretending. She was alive, and teleports Lana, Cole and the vault to the Sahara desert. Cole realizes if Lana’s Sue’s mum, he’s expected to be the dad. He’s not happy about this. While she’s at it, Sue also collects Justin, to act as he loving “older brother”. A happy ending.

As for Voodoo, she gets to live on the countryside acting as Faraday’s bodyguard. He’s scared Brother Eye will take over everything, so he hides in a bunker underground. Voodoo gets to have the house on the surface.

Meanwhile, StormWatch’s leap of faith pays off as they arrive on Earth. Engineer is so happy to see her teammate Hawkman alive that she can’t stop making out with him. Suddenly, the rests of the Carrier are latched on by a tractor beam from the Ant Farm, S.H.A.D.E.’s headquarters. Father Time, S.H.A.D.E.’s leader, says Brainiac is coming, and he’s the worst threat either organization has faced. So they need to borrow Engineer – whether she wants it or not. The two groups begin fighting, but Atom shrinks inside Father Time’s body, and starts fighting with his brain. Father Time reveals he only wants to murder Engineer – Brainiac took his entire race, and he’ll do anything to stop him from doing the same to the human race. He believes Engineer is compromised, that she’s his agent now. Ultimately, Atom stops Father Time and takes control of S.H.A.D.E. Frankenstein says whatever’s coming will be stopped by him and his new teammates – as the new StormWatch.

Soon after, Brainiac arrives on Earth’s proximity. StormWatch warns the Justice League, but right at the same Engineer is taken over by Brainiac again – as Father Time had feared. She takes down her teammates, breaks the Carrier’s hull and heads towards her master. She starts building a giant Brainiac head, while Brainiac heads to Earth and begins trapping New York City in a giant dome. StormWatch and some Justice League members approach the giant head, but when Hawkman touches it he disappears in a flash. Turns out this Brainiac is a god who lives outside of time and space, and all the different versions of Brainiac we have seen through the decades were mere avatars of this big one. He’s been trapping cities from all over the multiverse and storing them in his Blood Moon, including the original Wildstorm reality. And now he wants to do the same to New York.

Atom shrinks down to get inside the machine, where she finds Engineer in the center of all the different realities stored in there. She was the nexus, so Atom cuts down the cables around her and shuts down the machine. No longer able to send a signal to his Moon, Brainiac switches to manual mode, and starts elevating the city towards space. Right at the same time, Brother Eye spreads through the city, promising to protect it. Earth’s heroes make use of this, using Brother Eye’s technology along with The Atom’s powers to shrink down Brainiac until he’s no longer a threat. Afterwards, Superman uses all his strength to catch the falling city.

Once the Brainiac crisis is over, Eye reveals his hand, reveling itself against the heroes and killing Batman Beyond. The rest of the heroes prepare a desperate plan: Tim Drake puts on the Batman Beyond cowl and travels to the past once more. There, he stops Brother Eye from letting passage to the Earth-2 citizens, thereby stopping the Earth-2 War. When he goes back to the future, however, the doomed reality still exists. He failed. Brother Eye still has the control. It’s a very disappointing ending to all these chapters, but I guess they wanted to keep selling Batman Beyond’s adventures. The story will go on in the pages of “Batman Beyond” but it won’t have anything to do with Wildstorm.

Next: “Convergence” issues 1 – 2, written by Jeff King & Scott Lobdell.


“Future’s End: Superboy” issue 1

Written by Frank J. Barbiere.

Wildstorm Concepts:  Gen13 - Freefall

All-star Western 2In the Future’s End timeline, Kon (Superboy) works with Rose Wilson, The Guardian and most surprisingly of all… Roxy Spaulding of Gen13 fame! But now she rocks a modern sidecut. This is writer Frank Barbiere’s second attempt at making a pilot for a Gen13 book. I’m guessing it didn’t work, because that book ended up not happening. Anyway, the team of kids fight against robot clones of Superboy – leftovers from Superboy’s Cyborg brother. Roxy keeps saving Kon using her gravity powers, flying around upside down and being carefree like ol’ Roxy always is.

She also happens to be Kon’s confidant and lover. She consoles Kon when he feels he hasn’t lived up to his potential of becoming Superman, feeling he’s failed “Caitlin and the rest”. You think he means the other Gen13 kids? Roxy says Kon taught her how to be a hero, and that’s pretty super, if you ask her.

Problems arise when three Superboys from different realities show up causing trouble. They’re hunting Superboys from other realities. Kon wants to take on everything by himself, but he’s obviously overpowered, so soon his team shows up and saves his butt.

To increase his powers, one of the evil Superboys absorbs his teammates and becomes a giant hulking monster. Once again, Kon says it’s his fight and he should deal with it alone, but Roxy reminds him they’re a family and they should fight together. Using all of their powers together, the bad guy finally blows up. And that’s a wrap for this brilliantly drawn story.

Next: “Future’s End” issues 31 – 48, written by Brian Azzarello, Jeff Lemire, Dan Jurgens and Keith Giffen.